During the first week of July, the Copper River Stewardship Program—comprised of 10 high school students from Cordova and communities further up the Copper River—traveled throughout the watershed learning about the various ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them. The group canoed on Alaganik Slough to the U.S. Forest Service Pete Dahl research camp to learn about wetlands and complete maintenance on artificial Dusky Canada Goose nest sites. The group also hiked through the rainforest on the Heney Ridge trail and spent time working on a video project. We All Live Downstream includes student-collected interviews, photos, and creative writing pieces from the trip.

To read a more detailed account of the trip, click here: We All Live Downstream by Robin Underwood

The Copper River Stewardship Program is coordinated by the Prince William Science Center, Copper River Watershed Project, Wrangell Institute for Science and Environment, Raven Feathers & the Wind, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, BLM Glennallen Field Office and the US Forest Service.  The 2014 program was made possible with support from Alaska Forum on the Environment, Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council, and BLM’s “Take it Outside Program.”

Participants pause to admire the giant old growth trees of Cordova’s coastal temperate rainforest.

Participants pause to admire the giant old growth trees of Cordova’s coastal temperate rainforest.